Design – Wikipedia

Drafting of a plan or convention for the construction of an object or of a system; process of creation; act of creativity and innovation

A design is a plan or specification for the construction of an object or system or for the implementation of an activity or process, or the result of that plan or specification in the form of a prototype, product or process. The verb to design expresses the process of developing a design. In some cases, the direct construction of an object without an explicit prior plan (such as in craftwork, some engineering, coding, and graphic design) may also be considered to be a design activity. The design usually has to satisfy certain goals and constraints, may take into account aesthetic, functional, economic, or socio-political considerations, and is expected to interact with a certain environment. Major examples of designs include architectural blueprints, engineering drawings, business processes, circuit

Read More

House – Wikipedia

Building that functions as a dwelling

Various examples of houses throughout the world, in different styles

A house is a building that functions as a home. They can range from simple dwellings such as rudimentary huts of nomadic tribes and the improvised shacks in shantytowns to complex, fixed structures of wood, masonry, concrete or other materials containing plumbing, ventilation, and electrical systems.[1][2] Houses use a range of different roofing systems to keep precipitation such as rain from getting into the dwelling space. Houses may have doors or locks to secure the dwelling space and protect its inhabitants and contents from burglars or other trespassers. Most conventional modern houses in Western cultures will contain one or more bedrooms and bathrooms, a kitchen or cooking area, and a

Read More

Family room – Wikipedia

A family room is an informal, all-purpose room in a house. The family room is designed to be a place where family and guests gather for group recreation like talking, reading, watching TV, and other family activities.[1][2] Often, the family room is located adjacent to the kitchen, and at times, flows into it with no visual breaks.[3] A family room often has doors leading to the back yard and specific outdoor living areas such as a deck, garden, or terrace.

The term family room is defined in the 1945 book Tomorrow’s House by George Nelson and Henry Wright.[4] Chapter 7, entitled “The Room Without a Name” spoke of the need in modern life for a new “biggest room in the house” that would serve the social and recreational needs of the entire family, allowing activities that would not be permitted in the living room.

This “big

Read More

Green room – Wikipedia

In show business, the green room is the space in a theatre or similar venue that functions as a waiting room and lounge for performers before and after a performance, and during the show when they are not engaged on stage. Green rooms typically have seating for the performers, such as upholstered chairs and sofas.

The origin of the term is often ascribed to such rooms historically being painted green.[1][2] Modern green rooms need not necessarily adhere to a specifically green color scheme, though the theatrical tradition of the name remains.

Possible sources of the term[edit]

The definitive origin of the term is lost to history, which has led to many theories and claims.

One of the oldest stories is that London’s Blackfriars Theatre (1599) included a room behind the scenes, which happened to be painted green; where the actors waited to go on stage.

Read More

Drawing room – Wikipedia

A drawing room is a room in a house where visitors may be entertained, and a historical term for what would now usually be called a living room. The name is derived from the 16th-century terms withdrawing room and withdrawing chamber, which remained in use through the 17th century, and made their first written appearance in 1642.[1] In a large 16th to early 18th century English house, a withdrawing room was a room to which the owner of the house, his wife, or a distinguished guest who was occupying one of the main apartments in the house could “withdraw” for more privacy. It was often off the great chamber (or the great chamber’s descendant, the state room) and usually led to a formal, or “state” bedroom.[2]

In modern houses, it may be used as a convenient name for a second or further reception room, but no particular

Read More

Decorator pattern – Wikipedia

In object-oriented programming, the decorator pattern is a design pattern that allows behavior to be added to an individual object, dynamically, without affecting the behavior of other objects from the same class.[1] The decorator pattern is often useful for adhering to the Single Responsibility Principle, as it allows functionality to be divided between classes with unique areas of concern.[2] The decorator pattern is structurally nearly identical to the chain of responsibility pattern, the difference being that in a chain of responsibility, exactly one of the classes handles the request, while for the decorator, all classes handle the request.

Overview[edit]

The decorator[3] design pattern is one of the twenty-three well-known GoF design patterns; these describe how to solve recurring design problems and design flexible and reusable object-oriented software—that is, objects which are easier to implement, change, test, and reuse.

What problems can it solve?

Read More

Arts and Crafts movement – Wikipedia

Design movement c. 1880–1920

The Arts and Crafts movement was an international trend in the decorative and fine arts that began in Britain and flourished in Europe and North America between about 1880 and 1920, emerging in Japan in the 1920s as the Mingei movement. It stood for traditional craftsmanship using simple forms, and often used medieval, romantic, or folk styles of decoration. It advocated economic and social reform and was essentially anti-industrial.[1][2][3] It had a strong influence on the arts in Europe until it was displaced by Modernism in the 1930s,[4] and its influence continued among craft makers, designers, and town planners long afterwards.[5]

The term was first used by T. J. Cobden-Sanderson at a meeting of the Arts and Crafts Exhibition Society in 1887,[6] although the principles and style on which it was based had been developing in England for at least

Read More

Design engineer – Wikipedia

A design engineer is a person who may be involved in any of various engineering disciplines including civil, mechanical, electrical, chemical, textiles, aerospace, nuclear, manufacturing, systems, and structural /building/architectural.
Design engineers tend to work on products and systems that involve adapting and using complex scientific and mathematical techniques. The emphasis tends to be on utilizing engineering physics and sciences to develop solutions for society.

The design engineer usually works with a team of engineers and other designers to develop conceptual and detailed designs that ensure a product actually functions, performs and is fit for its purpose. They may work with industrial designers and marketers to develop the product concept and specifications to meet customer needs and may direct the design effort. In many engineering areas, a distinction is made between the design engineer and the planning engineer in design; analysis is important for planning engineers while synthesis is more paramount

Read More

Decorative arts – Wikipedia

The front side of the Cross of Lothair (c. 1000), a classic example of “Ars Sacra”

The decorative arts are arts or crafts whose object is the design and manufacture of objects that are both beautiful and functional. It includes interior design, but not usually architecture. The decorative arts are often categorized in distinction to the “fine arts”, namely painting, drawing, photography, and large-scale sculpture, which generally produce objects solely for their aesthetic quality and capacity to stimulate the intellect.

Distinction from the fine arts[edit]

The distinction between the decorative and fine arts essentially arose from the post-Renaissance art of the West, where the distinction is for the most part meaningful. This distinction is much less meaningful when considering the art of other cultures and periods, where the most valued works, or even all works, include those in decorative media. For example, Islamic art in many

Read More

Living room – Wikipedia

A California tract home living room, with a kitchen behind a permanent space divider, 1960

In Western architecture, a living room, also called a lounge room (Australian English[1]), lounge (British English[2]), or sitting room (British English[3]), is a room in a residential house or apartment for relaxing and socializing. Such a room is sometimes called a front room when it is near the main entrance at the front of the house, it is also known as drawing room. In large formal homes, a sitting room is often a small private living area adjacent to a bedroom, such as the Queen’s Sitting Room and the Lincoln Sitting Room of the White House. The term living room was coined in the late 19th or early 20th century.

Overview[edit]

In homes that lack a parlour or drawing room, the living room may also

Read More